Pepsi Cola Hits the Spot

Long before the slew of rhymes my generation had about Michael Jackson and Pepsi, there were these variations of "Pepsi Cola Hits the Spot," a jingle that actually pre-dates TV commercials: it was shown in movie theatres as far back as the 1930s, making it one of the first filmed commercials of all time! It was also a radio spot circa 1936.

The official version went: "Pepsi Cola hits the spot / twelve full ounces, that's a lot / twice as much for a nickle, too / pepsi cola is the drink for you!"

It was said to double Pepsi's sales. It also spawned a whole generation of parodies. They were out of circulation by the 80s, at least at my school, but here's what Kay Shapero collected:

From Carla De Hoyos

Pepsi cola hits the spot
makes you throw up in a pot
Throw up til your face turns green
Drink Seven up with no caffeine.


From Irving H. Willis

Pepsi Cola is the drink
To pour down your kitchen sink
Taste like vinegar, looks like ink
Pepsi Cola, sure does stink.


From Robert Carr

Christianity hits the spot,
Twelve apostles, that's a lot,
Jesus Christ and a virgin too,
Christianity's the religion for you.


(note: the above was current in Chicago in the late '30s, early '40s)

I've heard scattered reports of the songs turning up on playgrounds to this day. I'm not sure if the tune survives, though. Here's the original:

12 comments:

  1. Years ago, my mom told me the version that she heard as a kid:

    Pepsi Cola hits the spot
    In your stomach it will rot
    Tastes like vinegar, smells like wine
    Oh my God, it's turpentine!

    That would have been in the Charleston, SC area in the 1950's.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Pepsi cola hits the spot
    2 fat ladies on the pot
    push the button, pull the chain
    2 fat ladies down the drain

    ReplyDelete
  3. My Dad used to sing:

    "Coca-cola hits the spot
    in your stomach it will rot
    tastes like beer, looks like wine
    but it's really turpentine.

    Chug chug
    guzzle guzzle
    drink it up
    drink it up

    chug chug
    guzzle guzzle
    drink it up
    drink it up

    chug chug
    guzzle guzzle
    drink it up
    drink it up

    Drink it up!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I forgot to say I'm 36, and he sang it ever since I can remember. He grew up in Washington State.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I remember this from the 50's in Granite City, Ill. (Metro east, St. Louis) hearing it this way:

    Pepsi Cola hits the spot
    'specially when you're on the pot
    Press the button
    Pull the chain
    Out comes a little choo choo train.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Vote for Cola at http://coolometer.org ! It has a much better flavor, where as Pepsi is an artificial copy of Coke.

    ReplyDelete
  7. 60's, South San Francisco, California.

    Pepsi Cola hits the spot,
    ties you belly in a knot,
    tastes like vinegar looks like ink,
    Pepsi Cola the stinky drink.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I heard it from my dear old dad (born 1937) as

    Pepsi-Cola hits the spot
    Ten minutes later you're on the pot
    Tastes like vinegar, looks like ink
    Pepsi-Cola sure does stink

    ReplyDelete
  9. And he grew up in Cleveland Heights, OH

    ReplyDelete
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  11. OK - Lomita, California, in the 1950s:

    Pepsi Cola hits the spot,
    Keeps you running to the pot.
    Push a button,
    Pull a chain,
    And out will come a brown choo-choo train.

    (Note: When pushing the button, press your nose, and pulling the chain, yank on your tongue)

    I don't believe this is on the net, but why should I be surprised? I was just telling my husband about it (the perverted jingle) and typed in "Pepsi Cola hits the spot keeps you running to the pot" as a joke, and here I am.

    ReplyDelete
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PLEASE tell us where and when you heard your version (ie, "Chicago, early 1950s). And please be aware that the information may end up in a book sooner or later.